May 24, 2016

Floating parade brings the works of Hieronymus Bosch to life

posted by Larra Morris

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First launched in 2010, the Bosch Parade is typically held each June in Bosch’s hometown, 's-Hertogenbosch (colloquially referred to as Den Bosch). The event’s organizers recruit professional artists, designers, composers, and choreographers to build elaborate, Bosch-themed floats, which they float down the Dommel River with the help of volunteers. In 2015, 18 watercrafts participated in the event, and thousands of onlookers watched the town’s self-professed “cruise of the absurd” from the river’s banks.
via Mental Floss

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May 24, 2016

Alcohol-monitoring bracelet pings your phone when it's time to ease up

posted by Larra Morris

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Tracking your blood alcohol level is never a bad idea, but huffing, puffing and whipping out a breathlyzer isn't always an option. Looking to unearth a more inconspicuous way of keeping an eye on things, the National Health Institute's Wearable Alcohol Biosensor Challenge put the call out for non-invasive solutions to this problem, and has now selected its winner. The wrist-worn BACtrack Skyn pairs with an app to offer real-time monitoring of alcohol levels, even alerting the user's phone when they are drinking too hard.
via Gizmag

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May 24, 2016

Drone catches incredible 70-shark feeding frenzy

posted by Larra Morris

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This footage, captured above the appropriately named Shark Bay in Western Australia, shows what happens when 70 sharks come across a whale. It involves rather a lot of blood.

The once-clear waters of the bay fill with plumes of blood as the tiger sharks chow down without mercy on the humpback whale.
via Gizmodo

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May 23, 2016

An incredible machine that sorts random river stones by their geological age

posted by Larra Morris

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With an interest in connecting industrial automation with historical geology, Czech artist Prokop Bartonícek and German artist Benjamin Maus collaborated to create the Jller, an incredible kinetic machine that easily sorts random stones from a specific river by their geological age using pre-defined data ranges to guide the process. The machine also emits a very soothing incidental music as it goes about sorting, categorizing, selecting and placing the stones. Jller was presented as part of the Ignorance exhibition in Ex Post in Prague.
via Laughing Squid

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May 23, 2016

Researchers develop passive-aggressive robotic roommate

posted by Larra Morris

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While we've seen new robotic devices that can do everything from driving a car to thwarting underwater terrorists, a team of robotics researchers from Cornell and Stanford just want to make sure you never forget to put away the milk. At the International Conference on Robotics and Automation yesterday, the team presented Watch-Bot, a sort of robo-sentry that keeps an eye on the most mundane tasks in your home or office and politely shames you with a reminder if you forget to do them.
via Engadget

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May 23, 2016

Google patents safety system that glues pedestrians to cars

posted by Larra Morris

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Google's autonomous cars have been out and about for years, and so far their track record for safety is looking pretty good. But even for the best robot drivers, accidents do happen, so Google has patented a creative safety feature: an adhesive front end that glues pedestrians to the car in the event of an accident to prevent them bouncing off and further hurting themselves.
via Gizmag

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Image: Google/US Patent and Trademark Office

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May 20, 2016

Harvard engineers designed a 'soft wearable robot'

posted by Larra Morris

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A team of engineers from Harvard University's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have moved one step closer to a consumer version of a soft, assistive exosuit that could help patients with lower limb disabilities walk again. The Wyss Institute announced today that the university is collaborating with ReWalk Robotics to bring its wearable robotic suit to market.

The soft exosuit was designed by Dr. Conor Walsh, who also happens to be the founder of the Harvard Biodesign Lab, along with a team of roboticists, mechanical and biomechanical engineers, software engineers and apparel designers. What really makes the Wyss exosuit stand out from other exoskeletons and robotic suits, is its form-fitting and fabric-based design. Instead of a heavy, rigid frame, the exosuit uses small but powerful actuators tucked in the belt to assist the wearer's legs in a more natural way. 
via Engadget

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