Jul 15, 2014

Rocket scientist adds fins to pans and nearly doubles their efficiency

posted by Laura Domela

Pot-750x420.jpg

One rocket scientist has turned his attention to cookware, designing a new set of pots and pans that are touted as nearly double the energy efficiency of your ordinary round cookware. What's different? The addition of fins.

The new pots were designed by Oxford University professor of engineering Thomas Povey, who has developed what he calls the Flare Pan. With this pan, which is being sold through maker Lakeland, comes a promised 40-percent decrease in energy usage over conventional cooking pans, as well as the ability to heat up faster.
via Slashgear

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Jul 15, 2014

Finland's largest city wants to replace cars with apps

posted by Larra Morris

Screen_Shot_2014-07-14_at_10.10.32_PM.png

Car sharing has grown in popularity in recent years thanks to the internet and smartphones. But now the city government of Helsinki, Finland, wants to take that idea to its logical endpoint: replacing most privately owned cars by 2025 with a comprehensive route-planner app that would also offer access to all of the city's shared-transportation options, plus weather forecasts. As The Helsinki Times reported earlier this month, the idea is to offer every commuter a series of transportation options tailored directly to them and their circumstances: so if it's due to start raining, the app would recommend exactly when to swap a bike-share for a cab, for example.
via The Verge

Continue reading

Image: Hans Põldoja/Flickr

Tags :    0 comments  
Jul 15, 2014

MIT's new material opens the door to squishable, shape-shifting robots

posted by Larra Morris

mit-shape-shifting-robot-material.jpg

Robots tend to be either very rigid or very soft, but neither extreme is ideal; ideally, machines could both squish themselves into tight spaces and remain sturdy for strength-dependent tasks. They just might, thanks to a team-up between MIT and Google's Boston Dynamics. The two have developed a composite material that can switch between hard and soft states on the fly. The design mates a compressible foam inside with an external wax coating. If a robot needed to deform, all it would have to do is soften the right joints with a bit of heating. It could even heal damage by heating and cooling an affected area.
via Engadget

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Jul 14, 2014

Ancient seltzer bottle recovered from Polish shipwreck

posted by Larra Morris

Screen_Shot_2014-07-13_at_10.06.06_PM.png

A 200-year-old bottle of naturally carbonated water has been found, according to Discovery News. The perfectly preserved stoneware vessel was recovered from a shipwreck in the Gulf of Gdańsk near the Polish coast, and is dated between 1806 and 1830.

Underwater archaeologist Tomasz Bednarz told Discovery News this may be the oldest corked bottle from Selters, the German community famous for producing the eponymous brand of natural soda water.
via The Verge

Continue reading 

Image: National Maritime Museum, Gdańsk

Tags :    0 comments  
Jul 14, 2014

Aerosmith made more money from video games than from any one of its own albums

posted by Larra Morris

xbox.jpg

Planning to make it big in the music industry by releasing a hit album? Dream On. A long forgotten PC Mag article resurfaced this week to remind us that the music industry had changed drastically over the last decade. According to Activision chief Bobby Kotick circa 2008, Guitar Hero: Aerosmith "generated far more in revenues than any Aerosmith album ever has." The game in question has sold over four million copies to date, droves more than most album sales in the modern market.
via Engadget

Continue reading 

Image: PhilipRood.com/Flickr

Tags :    0 comments  
Jul 14, 2014

Teaching robots to play Angry Birds helps children's rehabilitation

posted by Larra Morris

robot_angry_birds.png

If Angry Birds is known for anything, it's an ability to keep youthful eyes glued to the screen for extended periods of time. But a new study conducted at Georgia Tech has shown that teaching a robot how to play the video game keeps kids slinging those wingless birds through the air for even longer, a finding that could help in the rehabilitation of cognitive and motor-skill disabilities.

The study observed how school-aged children engaged with Angry Birdsand how that engagement could be dictated depending on who was sitting alongside them. The kids were first asked to play the game as an adult watched on, and then to teach a robot how to play for themselves.
via Gizmag

Continue reading

Image: Georgia Tech

Tags :    0 comments  
Jul 14, 2014

Public to get to vote on names for exoplanets

posted by Larra Morris

Kepler-20-640x480.jpg

Yet the Public Naming of Planets and Planetary Satellites Working Group has come through. About a year ago, it determined that exoplanet names should follow the rules that govern the naming of minor planets in the Solar System. And it suggested that any group that wanted to run a non-commercial naming campaign (meaning, you can't charge to name a planet) should get in touch. A year later, the IAU is announcing its first naming campaign, run in collaboration with the citizen science site Zooniverse.

Before you get excited about naming HAT-P-7b after your first pet goldfish, it's worth taking a look at the restrictions the IAU places on its minor planet names. The 16 characters or less must be "pronounceable (in as many languages as possible)" and non-offensive in any language or culture. The names of living persons are verboten, pet names are "discouraged," and you can't use a name that is commercial or has political, military, or religious connotations.
via Ars Technica

Continue reading

Image: NASA

Tags :    0 comments  
Jul 14, 2014

A simple eye test could accurately detect Alzheimer's

posted by Larra Morris

eye.png

Current tests for Alzheimer's include expensive tests using brain PET or MRI imaging. But two studies have shown that a simple eye test can detect Alzheimer's accurately at very early stages—just by looking at subjects' retinas.

As you probably already know, Alzheimer's causes the loss of neurons and synapses in the brain and the accumulation of plaques and tangles of the protein beta-amyloid. The first study, led by Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, looked for signs of that protein in the retina. How? In one study, by having subjects ingest curcumin, which binds to protein to function as a "fluorescent tag," making the beta-amyloid visible in the eyes of subjects with the disease during conventional eye imaging.
via Gizmodo

Continue reading

Image: Australis Photography  

Tags :    0 comments  
Jul 11, 2014

Emotions used instead of cash at unique art auction

posted by Larra Morris

kostabodaartauction.jpg

If someone places the winning bid on a work of art at an auction, it must mean that they liked the piece more than any of the other bidders ... right? Well, actually, it could just mean that they were wealthier than any of the other bidders. Swedish design company Kosta Boda, however, recently held an event where money was irrelevant. In order to win a piece, bidders had to have the most pronounced physiological response upon first seeing it.
via Gizmag

Continue reading


Tags :    0 comments  
Jul 11, 2014

Smell may be the reason why cilantro tastes like soap to some people

posted by Larra Morris

Ciltantro-Process.png

Nacho Cabellero, a 3rd year bioinformatics PhD student at Boston University, explains about the genetic variant that causes the herb cilantro to taste like soap to 10% of those who had their genetics analyzed through 23andMe, himself included.

The first time I tried cilantro I didn’t realize it; I just thought somebody had emptied a bottle of Old Spice on my pizza in an attempt to poison me. Cilantro tastes like soap to approximately 10% of the people who have had their genotype analyzed by 23andMe. The currently accepted explanation is that those of us who passionately despise cilantro were born with a genetic variant known as a single-nucleotide polymorphism (or SNP, pronounced ‘snip’)…The cilantro SNP is called rs72921001, and apparently, its genomic location lays close to a cluster of olfactory receptor genes that includes OR6A2, the gene most likely to be alerting our brain about the presence of cilantro.
via Laughing Squid

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Get this feed  

Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register